Elder Care Resolutions for the New Year

resolutions

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who are raising your own family while providing support for aging parents, the new year can be a great time to reassess. This point in your life will likely be the busiest and most emotionally difficult.

With life pulling you in so many directions as a caregiver and a person, here are a few resolutions you can implement to make the most of the coming year for and your loved one.

1. Spend Quality Time Together. Once you’ve come to the stage where there are caretaking needs for elderly relatives, it sometimes becomes very difficult to enjoy time together because there are so many new responsibilities. Socializing and spending time together can actually improve your elder relative’s health and it also affords you time to create new memories which you’ll cherish.

2. Assess Your Elderly Loved One’s Home Situation. Whether your relative lives independently, in a care facility, or in your own home, it’s important to assess where they’re living each year. Their health needs may change over time and things that weren’t thought of months ago will be an issue going forward. Take stock of things like their mobility, whether or not they need caregivers at their location, and alternatives for regular support while allowing for as much independence as they are able to have.

3. Review Medical and Dietary Needs. Different aspects of aging can change dietary needs and appetite. Assess whether or not aging relatives are thriving health-wise and determine if they need changes in their care, diet, and hydration. This might include arranging for someone to do the shopping, having Meals on Wheels brought in to assist, or other options. Daily calling services can be arranged to remind elders to drink water, take medication, and move around.

4. Visit an Elder Attorney. Taking care of final affairs can be an emotional process, but it’s important for your elderly relatives to have their legal paperwork in order to better care for their needs and fulfill their wishes. An elder attorney can help you determine what steps to take, depending on the family member’s health and situation. This might include a living trust, power of attorney, or other measures to make sure that there is a family member who can help determine medical and financial decisions in the event that they are no longer able.

5. Take Time for You. With all of the responsibility in caring for your older relatives and your own family, you’re probably not taking as much time as you need to manage your own health. You can’t help anyone else if you’re making yourself sick or wearing yourself down. So take the proper steps to make sure you get the best medical and emotional support you need.

Taking responsibility for the care of elderly family members can be an emotional and exhausting time. For many, it’s also exceptionally rewarding to get to spend the remaining time together.

If you’re interested in more information on elder law to better prepare for the future, contact us today.

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